Reflections on Southeast Asian Studies: The Past, Present and Future

SEASymposium2024
24 Apr 2024 - 25 Apr 2024 SHHK Auditorium Alumni, Current Students, Industry/Academic Partners, Prospective Students, Public
Organised by:
Pattaratorn Chirapravati

From the late eighteenth century to the present, countries in Southeast Asia have experienced major political, social, and historical changes. Following the colonial period, new nations formed, with each country adopting a different political system ranging from presidential democracy to authoritarian communism. A variety of religions are practiced across the region, each having a significant influence on people’s lives. While Buddhism and animism are the major religious practices in Mainland Southeast Asia, Hinduism, Islam, and Christianity are observed by the majorities in Bali, Indonesia and Malaysia, and the Philippines, respectively. New types of art and architecture have also been created alongside the development of new nations. The diversity of people in Southeast Asia nurtures richness in various aspects such as culture, media, society, politics, and economics.

The symposium will focus on the following three major areas of study that NTU offers in the College of Humanities, Arts and Social Sciences, and the Wee Kim Wee School of Communication and Information: Panel I: Culture and Heritage, Panel II: Media Representations and Industries, and Panel III: Politics and History.


 

Programme

24 April 2024

3.30pm

Opening Remarks

Professor Joseph Liow, Dean, CoHASS

3.35pm

Keynote

“Siam Stamped: Philatelic Perspectives on Thailand’s Cultural Communication.”

Professor Duncan McCargo, Professor, Public Policy and Global Affairs

4.30pmReception
6.00pmEnd of Day 1
  

 

25 April 2024

8.30amRegistration and Refreshments
9.15am

Opening Remarks

Professor KK Luke, Chair, School of Humanities

9.30am

Panel I: Culture and Heritage

Chair: Assoc Prof Goh Geok Yian, NTU History

Speakers:

  • 1a: “Ritual, Buddhism and the State in Myanmar–intersecting and Conflicting Roles in Maintaining Heritage.” Charlotte Galloway (ANU College of Arts and Social Science)
  • 1b: “Repatriation of Southeast Asian Objects from Western Museum Collections: Lessons Learned and Ways Forward.” M.L. Pattaratorn Chirapravati, Visiting Professor, School of Humanities, WKWSCI, NTU
  • 1c: “From Kampung to Urban Singapore: A Tussle for Spatial and Socio-cultural Spaces.” Sa’eda Bte Buang (NIE, NTU)
  • 1d: “Not Nostalgia: Heritage, the Everyday, and Vernacular Forms as Persisting Critical Devices of Contemporary Southeast Asian Art.” iola Lenzi (SoH, NTU)
  • Panel Discussion and Q&A – 30 mins
11.30amLunch Break
1.00pm

Panel II: Media Representations and Industries

Chair: Professor May O. Lwin, Chair, Wee Kim Wee School of Communication and Information

Speakers:

  • 2a: “ASEAN Against Goliaths: Crafting Policies for a Fair Digital Future.” (1:20pm-1.40PM) Ang Peng Hwa, Director, University Scholars Program, Wee Kim Wee School of Communication and Information (WKWSCI), NTU 
  • 2b: “Interrogating the Disneyfication of Southeast Asia.” (1:40-2:00PM) Kevin Chew, Asst. Professor, Wee Kim Wee School of Communication and Information (WKWSCI), NTU
  • 2c: “Screen Terror Southeast Asia: Marketing, Distribution and Thematic Tradition in Thai Horror Cinema.” (2:00-2:20PM) Ian Dixon, Assoc. Professor, Wee Kim Wee School of Communication and Information (WKWSCI), NTU
  • 2d: "Servicing Smart Phones in Southeast Asia: The Case of CarlCare in Vietnam, Thailand, and Indonesia" (2:20-2:40PM) Jack Qiu, Professor, Wee Kim Wee School of Communication and Information (WKWSCI), NTU  
  • Panel Discussion and Q&A – 20 mins (2:40-3:00PM)
3.00pmCoffee Break
3.30pm

Panel III: Politics and History

Chair: Assoc Prof Kei Koga, Head of NTU Public Policy and Global Affairs

Speakers:

  • Opening Remarks by Assoc. Prof Kei Koga, Head, Public Policy and Global Affairs, SSS, NTU
  • 3a: “Reflections on the Transformation of Southeast Asian (Indonesian) Political Studies.” Edward Aspinall, Professor of Politics, Department of Political & Social Change, Coral Bell School of Asia Pacific Affairs, Australian National University
  • 3b: “Piety, Power and the Ulama: Religion and the State in Malaysia and Southern Thailand.” Walid Jumblatt Bin Abdullah, Asst. Professor, School of Social Sciences (SSS), NTU
  • 3c: “Micro-politics, Religious Territoriality and Community Formation in Singapore.” Lim Khek Gee, Francis, Assoc Professor, School of Social Sciences (SSS), NTU 
  • Panel Discussion and Q&A – 30 mins

5.30pm

Closing Remark

Professor May O. Lwin, Chair, Wee Kim Wee School of Communication and Information