Cross-Offering Courses - AY2022 Semester 1

 

 

The College synergies with its four schools to offer the following courses for Postgraduate (Research) students within the college.

Students can register these courses through the Cross-Programme Course Registration System.

library-of-books

 

 

Course CodeCourse TitleCourse Content / DescriptionPre-RequisiteCourse InstructorPre-approval required from Course Instructor
AP7046 (New course code)
AP9046 (Old course code)
Design: An Asian Perspective
Asia is the largest of the seven continents, extending from Turkey in the west to Japan in the east, consisting of 48 countries (49 if Taiwan is included), divided into six regions, with a total population of 5.2 billion people. This represents almost 60% of the world population. Design has been an art form in Asia from the Sumerian period till today, which means that every country has a rich socio-cultural and artistic heritage which can be reflected in the design of artifacts, environment and services.
Engagement with the west has transformed these unique societies, resulting in the adaptation of Western technology and style, so much so that design seems to have been 'democratised' as represented by products such as smartphones and automobiles. How can a designer engage with the cultural heritage of Asia in checking this erosion of traditional values while pursuing a lifetime in design in the contemporary world?
This course presents an opportunity to discover a personal perspective, which may be expressed through a student's work, that has been illuminated by an informed study of Asia within country in that continent.
Through lectures, discussions, field trips and hands-on tutorial exercises, students will investigate design as seen from an Asian perspective. This course is to be taken by graduate students under the direction of a faculty member.
By the end of this course, graduate students will have an enhanced appreciation of the topic and understand how it is essential to their research and future career. The advanced knowledge they attain will further consolidate their ability to formulate effective research questions and will inform their subsequent research methodology and analysis.
NILAssoc Prof Peer SathikhYes
AP7046 (New course code)
AP9049 (Old course code)
Proseminar in Art, Design and MediaThis course is designed for first-year graduate students (MA & PhD) in the School of Art, Design and Media (ADM) to introduce intellectual foundations of ADM research exploring the meaning of art and artist in a larger socio-cultural context and diverse research methods to execute scholarly researches in art, design, and media. Students will be acquainted with the major theoretical positions and reinforced the importance of theory for the study of ADM. Through readings, discussions, presentations and (peer) feedback, students will learn scholarly research processes and best practices for conducting and evaluating research with solid theoretical underpinnings and effective research methods. By the end of the semester, students will be able to generate a research prospectus linking a micro aspect of art, design and media with a macro implication in history, aesthetics, technology, culture, and society.NILAssoc Prof Chul HeoYes
AP7054 (New course code)
AP9054 (Old course code)
Experiencing Art & Technology
The body is individual, social, subjective and relational. The body is a representation, an experience, a technology and a site. Bodies can aggregate into spectacles, rituals, political entities and social constructs. The lived experience is deeply rooted in our bodies, it is a continuous occurrence of our body interacting with the environment.

You will gain exposure of understanding the body when considered by philosophy, neurology, anthropology, psychology, performance theory, social robotics and artificial intelligence. In turn, these exposures will equally fuel your appreciation of experiencing art & technology and impact your very own processes of making art.

This course will especially be relevant for students that have an artistic practice empowering human-centric technologies. The analytical and theoretical aspects of embodiment have gained a vast interest in research over the past decades. Nowadays, embodiment has become important facet of research methodologies found in interaction design, human-machine interfaces, immersive environments, experiential design, spatial and exhibit design and creative robotics to name a few.

This course invites graduate students to develop and articulate a component of their artistic research as an investigation on contemporary issues of embodiment. A semester project shall demonstrate this discourse and the format of the project is open to match your practice. It could either be a comprehensive essay or a hybrid that intermixes a prototype with a shorter essay.The body is individual, social, subjective and relational. The body is a representation, an experience, a technology and a site. Bodies can aggregate into spectacles, rituals, political entities and social constructs. The lived experience is deeply rooted in our bodies, it is a continuous occurrence of our body interacting with the environment.

You will gain exposure of understanding the body when considered by philosophy, neurology, anthropology, psychology, performance theory, social robotics and artificial intelligence. In turn, these exposures will equally fuel your appreciation of experiencing art & technology and impact your very own processes of making art.

This course will especially be relevant for students that have an artistic practice empowering human-centric technologies. The analytical and theoretical aspects of embodiment have gained a vast interest in research over the past decades. Nowadays, embodiment has become important facet of research methodologies found in interaction design, human-machine interfaces, immersive environments, experiential design, spatial and exhibit design and creative robotics to name a few.

This course invites graduate students to develop and articulate a component of their artistic research as an investigation on contemporary issues of embodiment. A semester project shall demonstrate this discourse and the format of the project is open to match your practice. It could either be a comprehensive essay or a hybrid that intermixes a prototype with a shorter essay.
NILAssoc Prof Louis-Philippe DemersYes
AP7055 (New course code)
AP9055 (Old course code)
Age in the Age of Creative MachineThis graduate-level course introduces you to the most recent research and critical machine learning theories in creative fields such as media art, music, performance, and literature. You will review and analyse how machine learning has transformed art and culture by examining and comparing human-based and machine-based art practices and Artificial Intelligence (AI) tools to enhance creativity and production. The course explores the future of creativity, the artist's role, and how machine learning will transform our understanding of what it means to be creative. You will explore cultural, historical, philosophical, and spiritual aspects of creativity and develop unique concepts and artistic prototypes utilising AI's uniquely visual, narrative, and performative potential. This course develops a foundation for students interested in exploring the creative possibilities of AI technologies and how they can assist artists with their creative process for new forms of storytelling, visual arts, and performance.NILAssoc Prof Ina ConradiYes

 

Course CodeCourse TitleCourse Content / DescriptionPre-RequisiteCourse InstructorPre-approval required from Course Instructor
HC7013 

Translation & Modern ChinaThis course aims at providing a comprehensive training in translation theories, with emphasis on the new discipline known as Translation Studies emerged in the 1970s. The course will illustrate the application and understanding of the theories with special case study in Modern China. Students will have a good grasp of various schools of thoughts in translation theories and a thorough understanding of the modern literary and cultural history.
NILAssoc Prof Uganda Kwan Sze PuiNo
HC7014A Study of Chinese-Language Film CultureThis course will analyse the camera movements and voices of Chinese-language film using the research paradigms of national cinema, transnational cinema, Sinophone cinemas, star studies, film genre, and auteur theory, in addition to their interactions with early popular culture and local history in various regions. This course also requires collation of historical files and incidents relating to film culture and language policies in different areas, and collecting records of films, film stars, and other early popular culture in old newspapers from various regions. In addition, interviews with directors, stars, or other film workers will be traced in order to examine the transnational production model and ideology of the Chinese-language film industry.
NILAssoc Prof Hee Wai SiamNo
HC7101Graduate Seminar
This course explores themes in Chinese studies in the areas of Chinese culture, literature, language, history, philosophy and/or arts. The course comprises of a series of seminar presentations and discussions on selected topics or topics of special interest to the students. Topics chosen will vary from year to year, depending on student enrollment and the availability of guest speakers. Students who complete this subject will gain familiarity with academic discourse in different subject areas. The course will be conducted in Chinese but English reading materials may be included. Students are required to complete a term paper and in class oral presentation. Written project involves either an analysis or a critical review on reading materials or on particular aspect of student's research interest.
NILAssoc Prof Yow Cheun HoeYes
HG7002Advanced Readings in Multilingual Research
This course will offer students the opportunity to read intensively in the area of how bilingualism impacts on the individual as well as the wider community. The approach is interdisciplinary as the readings will be drawn from psycholinguistics, sociolinguistics, education as well as cultural studies. The students will be acquainted with advanced theoretical discussion of bilingualism as a phenomenon. This intensive level of engagement will enhance their ability to frame and ask insightful research questions. The readings will also be geared towards an in depth understanding of the methodological concerns in the field. The course will focus on critical topics on bilingual individuals in bilingual communities.

At the end of the course, students will be more analytical about bilingualism as a social phenomenon. They will be more able to evaluate the impact it has on both individuals and the community and they will be more able to ask cutting edge questions relevant to the field. After completing this course, students will be able to pursue their own data collection for their own independent research in a multilingual context. This course will offer students the opportunity to read intensively in the area of how bilingualism impacts on the individual as well as the wider community. The approach is interdisciplinary as the readings will be drawn from psycholinguistics, sociolinguistics, education as well as cultural studies. The students will be acquainted with advanced theoretical discussion of bilingualism as a phenomenon. This intensive level of engagement will enhance their ability to frame and ask insightful research questions. The readings will also be geared towards an in depth understanding of the methodological concerns in the field. The course will focus on critical topics on bilingual individuals in bilingual communities.

At the end of the course, students will be more analytical about bilingualism as a social phenomenon. They will be more able to evaluate the impact it has on both individuals and the community and they will be more able to ask cutting edge questions relevant to the field. After completing this course, students will be able to pursue their own data collection for their own independent research in a multilingual context.
Background in Linguistics requiredAssoc Prof Ng Bee ChinYes
HG7005Advanced Readings in SociolinguisicsThis course covers advanced work in sociolinguistics, including consideration of a range of theoretical models and alternative methodologies for collecting data and analysing sociolinguistic variation. It offers a critical review of sociolinguistic methods for data collection and analysis. Students taking this course will develop their knowledge of the various approaches to the study of sociolinguistics to the point where they are able to conduct their own fieldwork and analysis of spoken language, and are able to deepen their understanding of the relationships between various social aspects and language use. Background in Linguistics requiredDr Luke LuYes
HG7010Approaches to Sound Structure in LanguageThis course will build on students' existing knowledge of phonetics and phonology. Beginning with a review of traditional articulatory descriptions of speech, the course will introduce students to major issues in the analysis and description of sound structure, and will provide them with a practical understanding of the essential approaches, frameworks, and methods that are applied in the field currently. Basic topics will include segmental acoustics, perceptual organization, phonological rule ordering, and a survey of tone and intonation systems, while more advanced topic areas will explore the representation of variation, the role of bias in language learning, and the influence of the lexicon.Background in Linguistics requiredAssoc Prof Scott MoisikYes
HG7020Readings in Linguistics ResearchThrough guided readings and hands-on tutorial exercises, students will read comprehensively in one area of Linguistics not offered as a course in the MA/PhD programme. This course is taken by graduate students under the direction of a faculty member, most likely the supervisor. The course offers a great flexibility in adapting to the individual academic interests of the student to the research interests of the faculty. By the end of this course, graduate students will have an enhanced appreciation of a topic essential to their dissertation. The advanced knowledge they attain will further consolidate their ability to formulate effective research questions and will inform their subsequent MA and PhD research methodology and analysis.Background in Linguistics requiredAssoc Prof Tan Ying YingYes
HG7025Topics in NeurolinguisticsThis course introduces functional neuroimaging at a more advanced level. Specific areas include neural representation of written language comprehension, neural representation of speech perception and neural representation of multiple languages Background in Linguistics requiredAsst Prof Francis WongYes
HG7027Embodied ActionsGraduate students of linguistics necessarily require a profound appreciation of the various factors that govern our use of language in situated environments, including para-linguistic dimensions. This course deals with the advanced methodology used in the general domain of discourse analysis and will broaden graduate study options in LMS, thereby exposing students to new avenues of linguistic inquiry.​ Background in Linguistics requiredAsst Prof Lim Ni EngYes
HG7033Analysis of Talk-In-InteractionThis course offers an overview of how talk-in-interaction can be systematically analyzed using the methods of Conversation Analysis. Beginning with a sketch of the history of the field and a consideration of some basic concepts (e.g., turn-taking, sequence organization and recipient design), the course will quickly move into the business of doing (guided) data analyses. Students will learn how to do this kind of analysis through weekly hands-on sessions using naturally occurring data (mostly audio and video recordings of talk-in-interaction).Background in Linguistics requiredProf Luke K KYes
HG7034Laboratory Methods in Phonetics & PhonologyRecent developments in phonetics and phonology have seen a collapse of the traditional division between these two disciplines and the emergence of a new, hybridized approach. So-called laboratory phonology emphasizes the use of measurable phonetic evidence in order to explore the nature of the abstract cognitive representations that underlie speech sounds. The phonetic data may be drawn from virtually any source, including experiments, spontaneous speech corpora, or field data, though crucially the observations are based on instrumental measurement, and claims must be quantitatively testable. This course provides students with significant training in this approach through a series of extended practica involving data collection and analysis. Students will learn how to identify and use phonetic data to argue for specific theories of the cognitive mechanisms that underlie speech sounds. A key theme of the course concerns how gradient variation in speech can be represented and explained. By the end of the course, students should be able to conduct original research involving a phonetic or phonological component that is both convincing and relevant to the contemporary linguistics community.Background in Linguistics requiredAssoc Prof Scott MoisikYes
HH7888Directed Reading in HistoryThe course is designed to provide students with a more individualized course of reading that goes beyond the existing graduate courses. In this course, students are expected to read widely in their chosen field under the guidance of their supervisor. The content and requirements of each Directed Reading course are determined by the students in consultation with his/her supervisor. The reading list, written work and meeting times will be negotiated between the supervisor and the student.  Prior agreement of a History faculty member to conduct HH7888Asst Prof Michael YeoYes
HH9001Transnational History: Theories, Methods & PracticesThis course will offer an introduction on major theories, ideas, methods, practices and problematics associated with the transnational turn in the historical analysis (and the humanities in general). There are 3 main components to this course. The first, a critical review on the conventional nation-state history that emerged in the 19th century and has dominated much of historiography until recently. The second part examines the emergence and characteristics of the "transnational turn" and the key themes in transnational history. The third part will uses cases from various world regions to show how transnational history has been applied to the study of globalization, regionalization, technological transformations and provide an alternative to national history. Background in humanities, art/design/media, or social sciencesAsst Prof Faizah ZakariaYes
HH9012Special Topics in HistoriographyThis course provides graduate students with an advanced introduction to the current debates on historiography. The course focuses primarily on discussion of the major topics that form historical studies of the twenty-first century. Books, articles and themes will be discussed in the context of global history and the history of localities. In any given year in which the course is offered, the topic(s) chosen for discussion may include, but not necessarily limited to one or more of the following: Economic history, Social and Cultural History, Historical Globalization and Local history, Theories of history. Background in humanities, art/design/media, or social sciencesAsst Prof Ivy Yeh Yes
HH9016Advanced Directed Readings in HistoryThis course is designed to provide a student with a more individualized course of reading that goes beyond the existing graduate courses. In this course, students are expected to read widely in their chosen field under the guidance of their supervisor/instructor. HH9016 is intended to provide students with a more advanced reading course than HH7888. Students whose research speaks to multiple audiences within and beyond history may also explore another sub-field or a differing approach to history than they examined in HH7888. The content and requirements of each directed reading course are determined by the student in consultation with his/her supervisor/instructor. The reading list, written work, and meeting times will be negotiated between the supervisor/instructor and the student. The final detailed syllabus will be subject to the approval of the Head of Division, prior to the commencement of the course.Prior agreement of a History faculty member to conduct HH9016Asst Prof Michael YeoYes
HL7101Graduate Seminar in the History of Literary TheoryHL7101 is an introduction to the main trends of critical literary theory, with an emphasis on major schools of thought in twentieth- and twenty-first century literary criticism and theory, ranging from Russian formalism to recent developments in disability studies and ecocriticism. We consider developments and interconnections between various schools of thought, including Marxism and new historicism, poststructuralism and narrative theory, feminism and queer theory, aesthetic and cognitive approaches, and so on. In this course, we specifically consider critical literary theory as a toolbox of methods and approaches that allow us to enrich our reading and interpretation of literary texts in a range of mediums and genres.Background in English literature requiredAsst Prof Michelle Wang WanzhengYes
HL7113Graduate Seminar in Postcolonial Literature & TheoryThis course explores the field of postcolonial studies through a detailed engagement with representative works of postcolonial literature and theory. We will be discussing literature from throughout the postcolonial world, and focusing on some of the major social, historical and political issues this literature addresses. The course will also trace the development of postcolonial theory, from the anti-colonial writings of Frantz Fanon and Aim'e Ce'saire to the work of more recent postcolonial critics such as Edward Said, Homi Bhabha, and Gayatri Spivak. Finally, we will be subjecting 'postcolonial studies' itself to critical scrutiny, addressing some of the key debates and controversies within the field.Background in Literature requiredProf Shirley ChewYes
HL7201Graduate Seminar in Creative Writing: Directed StudyThe Graduate Seminar in Creative Writing: Directed Study will provide graduate students with an opportunity to engage in independent research related to their proposed dissertation/thesis and to produce an appropriate example of written work arising from this. Only available to ELH students and IGP students who have a supervisor in the English programme. Students must check with Graduate Coordinator before registeringAsst Prof Christopher Trigg
Only open to IGP students. Prior approval from the Graduate Coordinator is required

Not Open to Students from Other Schools
HL7203Graduate Seminar in Creative Writing: Forms of NarrativeThe Graduate Seminar in Creative Writing: Forms of Narrative is designed to develop students awareness of, and technical facility with the employment of varying forms of narrative in literature, in addition to developing a contextual awareness of their own creative work in relation to past and contemporary literature and theory. NilAsst Prof Barrie SherwoodYes
HL7888Directed Study in LiteratureThis course will provide graduate students with an opportunity to engage in independent research related to their proposed dissertation/thesis and to produce an appropriate example of written work arising from this. The content and requirements of each Directed Study module are to be determined by the student in conjunction with the appointed supervisor/ thesis committee and the Head of Division.Only available to ELH students and IGP students who have a supervisor in the English programme. Students must check with Graduate Coordinator before registeringAsst Prof Christopher Trigg
Only open to IGP students. Prior approval from the Graduate Coordinator is required

Not Open to Students from Other Schools
HY7011Directed Reading in PhilosophyThis course is designed to provide students with an individualized course of reading that goes beyond the existing graduate courses. Specific contents of the course may vary depending on student needs and instructors. In this course, students are expected to read assigned material thoroughly under the guidance of their supervisor and to develop research projects.NIL
Asst Prof
Grace Boey,
Dr Melvin Chen
Yes
HY7012Independent Study for Thesis PreparationThis course provides students with an opportunity to engage in independent research related to their proposed thesis. The content and requirements of each Independent Study module are determined by the appointed supervisor and the student, depending on their area of interests. In this course, students are expected to develop a reading list under the guidance of their supervisor, to read widely both primary and secondary material, and to write a thesis outline as preparation for the thesis.NIL
Prof Li Chenyang,
Asst Prof
Grace Boey

Only open to IGP students. Prior approval from the Course Instructor is required

Not Open to Students from Other Schools
HY7013Independent Study on Special TopicsThis course allows students to engage in in-depth study of a philosophical subject chosen by the teaching faculty member. Assessment of this course include reading reports, face-to-face discussion, and research papers.NIL

Assoc Prof Winnie Sung;
Asst Prof Lim Chong Ming

Only open to IGP students. Prior approval from the Course Instructor is required

Not Open to Students from Other Schools
HY7021Directed Reading in Philosophy II
The Division of Philosophy proposes HY7021 Directed Reading in Philosophy II for our MA and PhD programme in Philosophy. The main purpose of this course is for graduate students to focus on a set of individualized readings on an advanced topic in philosophy. These readings will go beyond any existing graduate courses. Specific contents of the course may vary depending upon student needs and faculty areas of specialty. The secondary goal is for students to gain experience with independent research. Students will conduct readings on their own with support from faculty, and write up a significant research paper based upon those readings. 
 
There is already a course HY7011 Directed Reading in Philosophy, but it can only be taken once for credit. At the graduate level, however, students who are interested in specific research topics that are not covered in existing graduate courses may need to do such a directed reading course more than once. This course is being proposed so that such students will be able to take a second Directed Reading course for credit.
NIL
Assoc Prof Andrew Forcehimes
Only open to IGP students. Prior approval from the Course Instructor is required

Not Open to Students from Other Schools
HY7025Special Topics in Chinese Philosophy IIThis course focuses on selected topics in Chinese philosophy, especially those during the pre-Qin period. Topics may vary depending on instructors. The course is conducted in English, though Chinese terminologies are introduced. In this course, students will conduct in-depth reading of selected material and become familiar with related subjects. A final paper is required.NILAssoc Prof Winnie Sung
Only open to IGP students. Prior approval from the Course Instructor is required

Not Open to Students from Other Schools

 

Course CodeCourse TitleCourse Content / DescriptionPre-RequisiteCourse InstructorPre-approval required from Course Instructor
HE7101Seminar in MicroeconomicsThe aim of this course is to provide a solid foundation in microeconomics at the graduate level. The course teaches tools related to optimization behavior and equilibrium analysis, bringing together topics in classical consumer and producer theories under perfect competition with modern game theoretical analysis. The core concepts are complemented with various applications, but the focus is on concepts and methods.Undergraduate Mathematical Economics and Intermediate MicroeconomicsJonathan YeoYes
HE7102Seminar in MacroeconomicsThis course provides a one-semester graduate level course in macroeconomics that covers a range of topics. The course is divided into three broad topics: The first set of topics includes a brief overview of the growth literature and discussions on a few papers on general equilibrium (GE) growth models (exogenous and endogenous growth, and without and with credit constraints). The second set of topics is on business cycle models (dynamic stochastic general equilibrium (DSGE) models without nominal rigidities) to examine the impact of various shocks such as news, technological change, or uncertainty etc., on output, consumption, employment, investment and asset prices. The third set of topics is on New Keynesian models (DSGE models with nominal rigidities) to examine optimal monetary and fiscal policies under various types of shocks including monetary shocks. During the discussions, the students will also be introduced to software platform Dynare, and other Matlab toolboxes, which may be used to numerically solve DSGE models.​Mathematical Economics, Intermediate MacroeconomicsJoseph AlbaYes
HP7208Special Topics In Cognitive Psychology
Tagged to HP4261 Computational and Cognitive Neuroscience of Vision
This course provides graduate students with an advanced introduction to empirical findings, methods, and theoretical perspectives, in the field of cognitive psychology. The course focuses heavily on discussion of the major findings and the theoretical positions that drive current research in cognitive psychology. Research findings will be discussed in the context of both modern theories and the theoretical positions from which they originate. In any given year in which the course is offered, the topic(s) chosen for discussion may include, but not necessarily be limited to, one or more of the following: (i) attention and memory, (ii) reasoning and problem solving, (iii) judgment and decision making, (iv) intelligence and learning, (v) perception.
General knowledge in Cognitive PsychologyCharles OrYes
HP7209Special Topics In Sensation/Perception
Tagged to HP4262 Multisensory Integration
This course provides graduate students with an advanced introduction to empirical findings, methods, and theoretical perspectives, in the field of sensation and perception. Multisensory integration is an important area in psychology and behavioral neuroscience. The course focuses heavily on discussion of the major findings and theories of research on vision, audition, and visual-auditory integration. It will focus on the brain mechanisms for the individual sensory systems and integrating the sensory systems, and its application in multimedia processing. The course is pitched on an advanced level so that students can broaden their knowledge of vision, audition, and multimedia perception for future research.
 Xu HongYes
HP7218Language In Perception & Thought
Tagged to HP4063 Research Lab In Language In Perception & Thought
This course provides graduate students with an advanced introduction to empirical findings, methods, and theoretical perspectives from the field of psycholinguistics, as they pertain to the relationship between language, perception and thought. In the first half of the semester, the Whorfian Hypothesis will be introduced. Topics will include grammatical gender, categorical perception, spatial and numerical cognition. Perspectives from the domain of cross-modal perception and synaesthesia will be introduced to provide neurological bases for language-perception interactions. In the second half of the course, students will conduct a mini-study on interactions between language and vision, language and audition, or language and number, the results of which they will present at the end of the semester. An in-depth focus on the development of speech perception will be used as a test case for discussions about the direction of influence between language and cognition/perception. Interactions between mind and language in extreme scenarios will also be addressed.
Prior studies/classes in any of the following: Psychology, Linguistics, Philosophy of language, Cross-Cultural Communication, Cultural Anthropology. (Other related disciplines may be approved on request)Suzy StylesYes
HP7235The Last Dance: Psycho-Socio-Cultural Perspectives Of Death, Dying & Bereavement
Tagged to HP4274 The Last Dance: Perspectives Of Death, Dying & Bereavement
This course provides an interdisciplinary overview of the major psycho-socio-cultural perspectives, theories and clinical practices on death and dying from a global viewpoint with a critical focus on the Asian experience. Through interactive lectures, experiential workshops and creative group projects, students will be offered an opportunity to examine the psychological, socio-spiritual, ethical and political issues of mortality through a range of cultural lenses. Such exploration will facilitate insights, reflections and personal growth for enhancing students’ capacity in dealing with the inevitability of morality, while equipping them with the core intellectual skills and values for living a meaningful and purposeful life.
 Andy Ho Hau YanYes
HP7257Integrative Animal Behavior
Tagged to HP3205 Animal Behavior
Animal behavior is the scientific investigation of behavior. The integrative approach to behavior was derived from animal studies, and it applies various levels of causation for explaining behavior. Animal behaviorists integrate proximate mechanisms, developmental processes, and evolution into how we explain behavior. In this course, students will learn how to measure and study behavior, as well as being challenged to apply an integrative approach to understanding behavioral processes. Students will learn some foundational mechanisms of behavior and how behavior is influenced by genetics, neurology, and physiology. Furthermore, students will learn developmental processes affecting behavior. Students will also be exposed to a wide rang of behavior, including feeding and predation, sociality, communication, aggression, reproductive behavior, and territoriality. As a graduate student, he/she will gain some experience reading the primary literature in the field and developing a research project in animal behavior.
Background in Psychology/Biology/Ecology or permission of the instructorMichael GumertYes
HP7302Qualitative Methods In Psychology
Tagged to HP4002 Qualitative Methods In Psychology
This course introduces the theoretical foundations and basic techniques of qualitative methodology for psychological research, including how to conduct interviews and focus groups, grounded theory fundamentals, content analysis, domain analysis, coding, and how to write up qualitative findings. Students will be expected to complete weekly readings and weekly skill development tasks in and out of the classroom as well as to collect data, and then analyze and present findings based on the techniques covered in the course.
 Andy Ho Hau YanYes

 

Course CodeCourse TitleCourse Content / DescriptionPre-RequisiteCourse InstructorPre-approval required from Course Instructor
A9107Advanced Quantitative Analysis for Communication and Information Research
This course introduces students to structural equation modelling. After reviewing fundamental statistical analyses, students will learn the process of conducting structural equation modelling. 
The course content is divided into three thematic groups:
Theme 1 - Analytical and statistical fundamentals: This theme involves class discussions, activities, and assignments about several common statistical analyses.
Theme 2 - Conducting structural equation modelling: This theme introduces key concepts and the process of conducting structural equation modelling.
Theme 3 - Special topics: This theme focuses on special uses of structural equation modelling, which researchers can use to answer many different research questions.
Students should know how to conduct and interpret correlation analysis, hierarchical regression analysis, and ANOVA.Asst Prof Sonny RosenthalYes
A9109Advertising Theory and Consumer Psychology
This course introduces students to the essential theories and research on media influence and persuasion and equips students with the skills needed to test those theories in empirical studies.
After reviewing the philosophical and structural foundations for theory construction with specific models and topics, with focus on the concepts, theoretical issues, theoretical soundness, and methodological choices made by the authors of the articles used in class, each student is expected to develop a research paper/proposal by the end of the semester.
NILAsst Prof Chen LouYes