Chng Eng Siong

I am currently an Associate Professor in the School of Computer Science and Engineering, Nanyang Technological University, Singapore. I received the BEng (Hons) in Electrical and Electronics Engineering from the University of Edinburgh, U.K in 1991, and PhD from the same University in 1996.

Prior to joining NTU in 2003, I have worked in the following research centres and companies:
1) 1996, Institute of Physics and Chemical Research, Riken (http://www.bsp.brain.riken.jp/), as a post-doc working in the area of signal processing and classification,
2) 1996-1999, Institute of System Science (ISS, currently known as I2R http://www.i2r.a-star.edu.sg/) as a research staff to transfer the Apple-ISS speech and handwriting technologies to ISS,
3) 1999-2000, Lernout and Hauspie (now part of nuance http://www.nuance.com/) as a senior researcher in speech recognition, and
4) 2001-2002, Knowles Electronics (http://www.knowles.com/search/products/array_technologies.jsp) as a manager for the Intellisonic microphone array research.
5) 2003 onwards: Asst then Associate Professor, NTU's School of Computer Engineering.

My research interests are in pattern recognition, signal, speech and video processing. I have published over 100 papers in international journals and conferences.

My current CV (2013 Jan).



Speech and Language Technology Program

I am leading the Speech and Language Technology Program @ Emerging Research Laboratories. Please visit the above site to find out more.



Directions to visit our lab

Our address is:  N4-B3b-13, Emerging Technology Graduate Lab (ETL),
School of Computer Science and Engineering, Nanyang Technological University, Nanyang Avenue, Singapore 639798

If you take taxi, just tell the drive the place. There is a map in this webpage: http://155.69.146.102/contact.

If you are coming by subway (called MRT in Singapore), you can alight at station EW28 (Pioneer) and then take the NTU shuttle bus at the bus stop near Exit A of the MRT station. You should stop at University Health Service