Nanyang Technological University

Re-purposing Soy Bean Residue for Yeast Cultivation

Re-purposing Soy Bean Residue for Yeast Cultivation

Researchers from NTU’s School of Chemical and Biomedical Engineering have found a way to slash the cost of producing yeast – a key ingredient in baking, beer making, and vaccine production. The immediate outcome of this, is saving 30,000kg of soy bean residue from going to waste in Singapore every year. The process of creating this new yeast growing medium takes just 5 days–by adding soy bean residue okara to other materials to create the medium to cultivate yeast.The wide-ranging potential of this new method of cultivating yeast includes cutting agri-food waste and making food production sustainable for the planet.

Benefits:
  • Cuts cost of cultivating yeast
  • Reduce dependency on potato and wheat for yeast cultivation
  • Available cheap–$3 per litre

“Our data shows that the culture medium we developed grows baker's yeast as fast as commercial culture media."

Lead researcher,
Professor William Chen,
School of Chemical and Biomedical Engineering

Moving Forward:

The new yeast cultivating medium can be used to produce many biotech products, including proteins and vaccines at low cost. This can help the world achieve food production sustainability, and reduce cost of food production.​

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