Nanyang Technological University

Q:
Why should I consider transforming my course to a TEL course?

A:
NTU's direction would be for students to access course content on their own before class so that lesson time is spent on discussions. This flipped classroom initiative was piloted in 2013 for the Part-Time Electrical & Electronic Engineering and Mechanical Engineering Bachelor Degree Courses. By 2020, some 1.500 courses will be converted to support this initiative.

Students nowadays rely more on technology to learn than before. Many of them appreciate well-crafted lessons and understand the advantages of using technology for learning.

These include, and are not limited to:

  • greater control over pace of learning and choice of materials
  • frequent feedback on progress from mini-quizzes in the learning activities
  • better communication as a result of lowered perceived risks due to the asynchronous nature of online discussions
  • the ability to always have a community of learners and teachers online to share ideas and solutions

Students feedback positively when TEL is done with careful consideration to pedagogy; they learn faster and at a more consistent pace.


Q:
Does TEL transformation mean that I have to adopt the flipped classroom approach?

A:
No, there are various transformation models faculty can consider in view of the teaching and learning needs of the course. Based on these requirements, the team will work with faculty to apply appropriate learning design to the course.

 

Q:
How do I state my requirements?

A:
LPMO will be in touch to gather requirements from faculty. This stage is exploratory and faculty are in full control of the development of their courses as the key objectives of TEL transformation are to address any teaching or learning issues and to continuously improve the courses.

 

Q:
What kind of support will I receive?

A:
After gathering requirements, a team consisting of a Project Manager, Learning Designer and a team of Multimedia and Video Specialists will support faculty in the transformation and development of the materials.

 

Q:
Will I have to develop the animations myself?

A:
No, the assigned team will be developing the animations and any other assets such as PowerPoint slides, lecture video recordings, etc.

 

Q:
Do I need to be technically sound to embark on a TEL course?

A:
When embarking on TEL, for the video recording process, there is practically no need for any technical skills on the faculty's part. Our video team will take care of the recording from the beginning to the end. As for LAMS, the sequences are created by the learning designers and learning technologists in close consultation with faculty members, prior to the commencement of the classes. Attending a 3-hour faculty development workshop on LAMS will enhance your ability to use LAMS.

 

Q:
So, what is required of me as a faculty?

A:
As the subject matter expert, faculty would be required to review and endorse the developed assets. With close coordination and working relationship, faculty would be updated of the development every step of the way. 

As the subject matter expert, the faculty is very important for the successful transformation of the course. Firstly, the faculty is responsible for content accuracy. As such, faculty would be required to review and endorse the developed assets (including the videos, animations as well as other assets). Should the course employ videos, the faculty will be required to prepare the necessary PowerPoint slides, and be available for the actual recording as well as the reviewing of the videos. For an indicative commitment based on past experience for a three AU, 13-week course, you will need to spend up to 80 hours with the development team and additional of up to 60 hours for your own preparation. Working hand in hand with the learning designer, the faculty has to adapt him/herself to a new mode of teaching and learning for the course.

 

Q:
Can those recorded videos in LT be used as video lessons?

A:
The lecture recordings are intended for students to do revision or catch up on lectures that they may have missed out on. However, the lectures that we will be putting up are meant for content delivery and has to be catered for as such. The style of delivery and the focus of the video will be different from those that are recorded in the LT. 2 key points to note are:

  • the audio and video quality of the LT recordings are not optimal for such delivery and
  • in LT recordings usually have unrelated "side" distractions such as students walking in/out, faculty having to quieten them down. On the area of student perception, the use of the LT recordings may also give the impression, the materials are simply reused rather than customised for them.

 

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